The following was included in TCTA’s, the ultimate reference tool for Texas educators, and is current as of September 2018 but is subject to change. The current state student assessment system, the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness, began in 2011-12. STAAR The STAAR system annually tests students in grades 3-8 and tests high school students via end-of-course exams. High school students must pass Algebra I, English I, English II, Biology and U.S. History end-of-course exams to graduate. Individual graduation committees must be established for students in 11th or 12th grade who have failed up to two of the EOCs.

The committee determines whether a student can graduate despite failing the exams. The committee is composed of the principal/designee, the teacher of each course for which the student failed the EOC, the department chair or lead teacher supervising the course teacher and the student’s parent (or the student if at least age 18). To graduate under this route, the student must successfully complete the curriculum requirements. The IGC must recommend additional requirements by which the student may qualify to graduate, including: (1) additional remediation; and (2) for each test failed, the completion of a project related to the subject area or the preparation of a portfolio of work samples in the subject area.

The IGC must consider the recommendation of the teacher of each relevant course, the grade in each relevant course, the EOC score, hours of remediation, attendance rate, satisfaction of TSI benchmarks, successful completion of dual-credit courses, and performance on additional measures. The committee’s vote to determine a student’s eligibility for graduation must be unanimous, and the decision is final and not appealable. These provisions expire Sept. A student who fails the Algebra I or English II EOC but receives a proficient score on the Texas Success Initiative in the corresponding subject satisfies the EOC passage requirements. Assessments must be designed so that they can be completed by 85 percent of students within two hours, in grades 3-5; or three hours in grades 6-8. The time allowed for test administration may not exceed eight hours and may occur on only one day.

TEA was required to conduct a study during the 2015-16 school year to develop an alternative method of assessing writing in grades 4-7, as well as the English I and II EOCs. TEA conducted a pilot of the alternative writing assessment method in designated school districts during the 2017-18 school year and may request an extension of the pilot.

Students who opt out State law provides that parents are not entitled to remove their child from a class or other school activity to avoid a test. TEA requires that students who are in attendance on the day of testing and choose not to participate or refuse to mark their answers, and who are in grades 3-8 or are taking an EOC for the first time, will have their tests submitted for scoring as is (meaning they will be recorded as failing the test). Limits on testing Field tests: Separate field testing of existing tests can be conducted no more than once every other year. TEA must notify each school district before the beginning of the school year of any required participation in field testing.

Benchmark tests: Districts are prohibited from administering more than two benchmark tests per state assessment, excluding administration of college prep assessments such as the PSAT, SAT, ACT, AP exams, etc. A parent can request additional benchmark tests.

Districts also are prohibited from administering any locally required test designed to prepare students for state-administered tests on more than 10 percent of instructional days; campus site-based decision-making committees may approve an even lower percentage of days. Test administration: Procedures must minimize disruptions to school operations and the classroom environment. Limits on removal from class: School districts are required to adopt policies that limit removal of students from class for remedial tutoring or test preparation for more than 10 percent of the school days on which the class is offered, unless the parent gives written consent. Vertical scale scores As required by law, TEA developed a vertical scale for assessing student performance on the English STAAR for reading and math in grades 3-8 and Spanish STAAR for reading and math in grades 3-6. Measure of annual improvement TEA is required to determine the annual improvement necessary for a student to be prepared to perform satisfactorily on grades 5 and 8 state assessments as well as the EOC exams required for graduation. Student report for teachers A school district is required to prepare a report of the comparisons made under the measure of annual improvement and provide it to teachers at the beginning of the school year for incoming students (a TCTA suggestion) as well as for students from the prior school year.

Student assessment data portal TEA established a student assessment data portal for use by school districts, teachers, parents, students and public institutions of higher education. Special education students STAAR Alternate: This test is designed to assess students in grades 3-8 and high school receiving special education services who have significant cognitive disabilities. The federal Every Student Succeeds Act puts a 1 percent cap at the state level on the number of students who can be assessed in this manner. Texas was granted a waiver from the cap in 2017-18.

STAAR Accommodated: This test is offered to special education students who do not qualify for STAAR Alternate but need help in accessing the content being assessed. STAAR A is an online assessment in the same grades and subjects as STAAR. The passing standards for STAAR A are the same as any STAAR test. STAAR A provides embedded supports, such as visual aids, graphic organizers, clarifications of construct-irrelevant terms and text-to-speech functionality.

Student promotion/accelerated instruction Texas’ Student Success Initiative, which prohibits the social promotion of students, places emphasis on the STAAR test for determining whether a student advances to the next grade level in grade 5 (a fifth-grade student must pass the math and reading STAAR tests to be promoted to grade 6) and in grade 8 (an eighth-grade student must pass the math and reading STAAR tests to be promoted to grade 9). For all other grades, districts must adopt a policy regarding student advancement. It must include: consideration of the student’s score on the state assessment to the extent applicable; the recommendation of the student’s teacher; the student’s grade in each subject/course; and any other necessary information determined by the district. Each time a student fails a state assessment, the school district must provide the student with accelerated instruction, which may require participation before or after normal school hours and may include participation outside of the normal school year.

The maximum class size for accelerated instruction classes in grades 5 and 8 is 10 students per instructor. A student in grade 5 or 8 who fails to complete the required accelerated instruction cannot be promoted. A student in grade 5 or 8 who fails the state assessment but is promoted must be assigned in all foundation curriculum subjects to teachers who meet all state and federal qualifications to teach those subjects and grades. The first time a student fails the STAAR in grade 5 or 8, he/she must be provided at least two opportunities to retest. On the third try, the district may administer an alternative assessment approved by the commissioner, and the student may be promoted if he/she performs at grade level on the alternative assessment. After a student fails the STAAR a second time, a grade placement committee must be established to prescribe the accelerated instruction program the student must receive. The GPC includes the principal or designee, the student’s parent or guardian, and the teacher of the subject of the failed STAAR test.

In the case of a special education student, the GPC is the Admission, Review and Dismissal committee. If the student fails the STAAR a third time, he/she must be retained unless the GPC unanimously determines that if promoted and given accelerated instruction, the student is likely to perform at grade level. In this case, the student must be provided with accelerated instruction, even after promotion. Test results release TEA must notify districts and campuses of test results no later than the 21st day after the administration date. The school district must disclose to each teacher the test results of the students that teacher taught.

Test details release On or before Sept. 1 of each year, the commissioner must make available on the the number of questions on the assessment instrument, the number of questions that must be answered correctly to achieve satisfactory performance, the number of questions that must be answered correctly to achieve satisfactory performance under the college readiness performance standard, and the corresponding scale scores for each of the state assessments. Test release schedule Tests must be released every three years. However, TEA can defer releasing tests to the extent necessary to develop additional tests.

Computer-administered tests optional The commissioner may not require school districts or charters to administer an assessment by computer. Test security It is a class C misdemeanor to intentionally disclose any portion of a test that is likely to affect the individual performance of one or more students on the assessment.

Scheduling during STAAR testing week UIL competitions may not be scheduled on Monday through Thursday, or the last testing day, of the primary STAAR assessment week. This provision does not apply to retesting.

. About the 2018 8th Grade STAAR Test Students in 8th grade take four STAAR tests: Math, Science, Reading, and Social Studies. Like the and grade STAAR Tests, each section has its own separate testing date. The 8th Grade STAAR Dates are as follows:. Wednesday, April 11:. Thursday, April 12:. Wednesday, May 16: Science.

Thursday, May 17: Social Studies After completing the test, students’ scores fall into one of the three performance standards: Level I: Unsatisfactory Academic Performance Level II: Satisfactory Academic Performance Level III: Advanced Academic Performance Read more about the. 8th Grade STAAR Math Test The 8th Grade contains 52 multiple-choice questions and four open-ended questions. The student is provided with graphing paper, a reference sheet, and a calculator. The test covers various mathematical concepts taught during the year. This may include, but is not limited to algebraic equations and functions, distance formula, converting data into equations, and interpreting charts and diagrams. Some of these questions may be especially challenging to students that have not before practiced enough math.

Try to focus on each question, write down all the necessary calculations even if some seem trivial to you. After you are familiar with the complete solution, you can think of ways to reach the answer more quickly and improve your performance time.

Some students may qualify for a Pre-AP mathematics course. In this case, students are not required to take the 8th Grade STAAR Test, but rather the EOC Algebra I Test. The first stage of prepping your child for the 8th Grade STAAR Math Test is pinpointing his or her level. This can be challenging to do on your own.

To help your child, TestPrep-Online has developed a general Math Practice Pack. This pack is designed specifically to pinpoint mathematical abilities, and to develop them. 8th Grade STAAR Reading Test The 8th Grade contains 52 questions and six passages of about 550–900 words in length. The 8th Grade STAAR is designed to be more challenging to the student and utilizes more complex paragraphs taken from various sources, such as fiction, poetry, plays, and nonfiction, as well as scientific articles. Students are required to analyze texts and discern factors such as theme, purpose, and perspective. Additionally, some questions may present a picture, and ask the student to determine the relationship between the text and the image.

Since the test contains such a variety of texts, it is recommended to practice with as many different types of passages, as well as typical reading comprehension questions. After you have practiced with a few passages, you will learn to recognize the information that is more relevant to the questions. You will also practice the skill that lets you quickly locate the crucial information, connect the questions to particular paragraphs, and distinguish more easily the answer choices that are either clearly incorrect or attempt to trick you. 8th Grade STAAR Science Test This test contains 55 multiple-choice questions. For assistance, students also receive a reference sheet of formulas and the periodic table.

STAAR Grade 8 Mathematics Assessment Reporting Category 1: Numbers, Operations, and Quantitative Reasoning – The student will demonstrate an understanding of numbers, operations, and quantitative reasoning. (8.1) Number, operation, and quantitative reasoning. The student understands that different forms of numbers are appropriate for different situations. The student is expected to: 8.1 (A) Compare and order rational numbers in various forms including integers, percents, and positive and negative fractions and decimals. Readiness Standard (STAAR). Underlying Processes and Mathematical Tools: These skills will not be listed under a separate recording category.

Instead, they will be incorporated into at least 75% of the test questions in reporting categories 1-5 and will be identified along with content standards. (8.14) Underlying processes and mathematical tools. The student applies Grade 8 mathematics to solve problems connected to everyday experiences, investigations in other disciplines, and activities in and outside of school.

The student is expected to: 8.14 (A) Identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to activities in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and with other mathematical topics.

Name of Resource Information and Links Virtual Professional Development Project Share. Close reading text modules English I. English II.

Additional EOC I and EOC Intervention Guidance N/A (If you have specific questions about this document, please contact ) Text sets Text-dependent writing prompts Texas Gateway Write for Texas Interim assessments Ready to STAAR SchoolNet Assessment Builder SchoolNet assessment builder Achieve 3000 for ELLs enrolled in ESL Reading courses United States History Since 1877 EOC Resources. Name of Resource Information and Links Virtual Professional Development United States History 1877 Through Present Interventions United States History 1877 Through Present Interventions Name of Resource Information and Links Virtual Professional Development HMH:GoMath! You must be logged in to www-k6.thinkcentral.com in order to access the HMH resource.

Think Through Math Think Through Math is an online math program that adapts lessons based on the academic needs of the student. The program content is aligned with the Texas TEKS standards, and combines live teacher support, unique student motivation, and engaging adaptive instruction in a web-based learning system. You must be logged in to in order to access the help and support videos. ESTAR/MSTAR Intervention Livebinder Descriptions of what each standard means a student will know, understand, and be able to do. The “unpacking” of the standards done in this document is an effort to answer a simple question “What does this standard mean that a student must know and be able to do?” and to ensure the description is helpful, specific and comprehensive for educators Clarify TEKS Support Videos are located within each tab TEA STAAR Resources Texas Gateway TEA STAAR Resources for 5th Grade Mathematics You must be logged in (sign up is free) at to view resources.: You must be logged in (sign up is free) at to view resources. Region 10 The following resources can be used to facilitate analysis of the released STAAR. Please watch this for a description of the STAAR Tools.

Lead4ward LearnZillion A complete curriculum for 5th grade focusing on expanding the understanding of fractions, developing an understanding of volume, and integrating decimals into the place value system. Name of Resource Information and Links Virtual Professional Development Go Math! These are supplemental resources. Think Through Math Think Through Math is an online math program that adapts lessons based on the academic needs of the student. The program content is aligned with the Texas TEKS standards, and combines live teacher support, unique student motivation, and engaging adaptive instruction in a web-based learning system. You must be logged in to in order to access the help and support videos. ESTAR/MSTAR Intervention Livebinder Descriptions of what each standard means a student will know, understand, and be able to do.

The “unpacking” of the standards done in this document is an effort to answer a simple question “What does this standard mean that a student must know and be able to do?” and to ensure the description is helpful, specific and comprehensive for educators TEA STAAR Resources TEA STAAR Resources for 8th Grade Mathematics STAAR Academic Vocabulary STAAR Academic Vocabulary from Lead4ward Name of Resource Information and Links Virtual Professional Development Think Through Math (TTM) Think Through Math is an online math program that adapts lessons based on the academic needs of the student. The program content is aligned with the Texas TEKS standards, and combines live teacher support, unique student motivation, and engaging adaptive instruction in a web-based learning system. You must be logged in to in order to access the help and support videos.

McGraw-Hill Algebra 1 Interactive Study Guide Supplemental Resource TEKS Interactive Student Guide Assessment and Learning in Knowledge Spaces (ALEKS) A ssessment and LEarning in Knowledge Spaces is a Web-based, artificially intelligent assessment and learning system. ALEKS uses adaptive questioning to quickly and accurately determine exactly what a student knows and doesn’t know in a course.

ALEKS then instructs the student on the topics she is most ready to learn. As a student works through a course, ALEKS periodically reassesses the student to ensure that topics learned are also retained. ALEKS courses are very complete in their topic coverage and ALEKS avoids multiple-choice questions. A student who shows a high level of mastery of an ALEKS course will be successful in the actual course she is taking. STAAR Test Analysis Tools (Region 10) 2015 Item Analysis of Algebra I EOC, including correlation of items to current student expectations, and including suggested instructional strategies Question stems showing items (2014, 2014, 2015) listed for each student expectations Planning guides (valuable in Spring 2016 Professional Learning Community meetings or for individual teaching planning) Livebinder Descriptions of what each standard means a student will know, understand, and be able to do. The “unpacking” of the standards done in this document is an effort to answer a simple question “What does this standard mean that a student must know and be able to do?” and to ensure the description is helpful, specific and comprehensive for educators TEA EOC Resources TEA End-of-Course Resources for Algebra 1 EOC Academic Vocabulary EOC Academic Vocabulary from Lead4ward. TEKS SEs B.4ABC Intervention Resources (B.4) Science Concepts.

8th Grade Math Staar Worksheets

The student knows that cells are the basic structures of all living things with specialized parts that perform specific functions and that viruses are different from cells. The student is expected to: (A) compare and contrast prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. S (B) investigate and explain cellular processes, including homeostasis, energy conversions, transport of molecules, and synthesis of new molecules. R (C) compare the structures of viruses to cells, describe viral reproduction, and describe the role of viruses in causing diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and influenza. R HMH PowerPresentations. HMH Virtual Lab.

Project Share. HMH Alternative Assessments.

HMH Summative Assessments. Download and edit files as necessary. TEKS SEs B.5ABCD Intervention Resources (B.5) Science Concepts. The student knows how an organism grows and the importance of cell differentiation. The student is expected to: (A) describe the stages of the cell cycle, including deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) replication and mitosis, and the importance of the cell cycle to the growth of organisms. R (B) examine specialized cells, including roots, stems, and leaves of plants; and animal cells such as blood, muscle, and epithelium.

S (C) describe the roles of DNA, ribonucleic acid (RNA) and environmental factors in cell differentiation. S (D) recognize that disruptions of the cell cycle lead to diseases such as cancer. S HMH PowerPresentations. HMH Virtual Lab. Project Share.

HMH Alternative Assessments. HMH Summative Assessments. Download and edit files as necessary.

TEKS SEs B.6ABCDEFGH Intervention Resources (B.6) Science Concepts. The student knows the mechanisms of genetics, including the role of nucleic acids and the principles of Mendelian Genetics. The student is expected to: (A) identify components of DNA and describe how information for specifying the traits of an organism is carried in the DNA. R (B) recognize that components that make up the genetic code are common to all organisms. S (C) explain the purpose and process of transcription and translation using models of DNA and RNA.

S (D) recognize that gene expression is a regulated process. S (E) identify and illustrate changes in DNA and evaluate the significance of these changes. R (F) predict possible outcomes of various genetic combinations such as monohybrid crosses, di-hybrid crosses, and non-Mendelian inheritance. R (G) recognize the significance of meiosis to sexual reproduction. S (H) describe how techniques such as DNA fingerprinting, genetic modifications and chromosomal analysis are used to study the genomes of organisms.

S HMH PowerPresentations. HMH Virtual Lab.

Project Share. HMH Alternative Assessment. HMH Summative Assessments. Download and edit files as necessary.

TEKS SEs B.7ABCDEFG Intervention Resources (B.7) Science Concepts. The student knows evolutionary theory is a scientific explanation for the unity and diversity of life. The student is expected to: (A) analyze and evaluate how evidence of common ancestry among groups is provided by the fossil record, biogeography, and homologies, including anatomical, molecular, and developmental. R (B) analyze and evaluate scientific explanations concerning any data of sudden appearance, stasis, and sequential nature of groups in the fossil record. Partner k1200 mark 2 manual.

S (C) analyze and evaluate how natural selection produces change in populations, not individuals. S (D) analyze and evaluate how the elements of natural selection, including inherited variation, the potential of a population to produce more offspring than can survive, and a finite supply of environmental resources, result in differential reproductive success. S (E) analyze and evaluate the relationship of natural selection to adaptation and to the development of diversity in and among species. R (F) analyze and evaluate the effects of other evolutionary mechanisms, including genetic drift, gene flow, mutation, and recombination. S (G) analyze and evaluate scientific explanations concerning the complexity of the cell.

S HMH PowerPresentations. HMH Virtual Labs. Project Share. HMH Alternative Assessments.

HMH Summative Assessments. TEKS SEs B.8ABC Intervention Resources (B.8) Science Concepts. The student knows that taxonomy is a branching classification based on the shared characteristics of organisms and can change as new discoveries are made. The student is expected to: (A) define taxonomy and recognize the importance of a standardized taxonomic system to the scientific community.

S (B) categorize organisms using a hierarchical classification system based on similarities and differences shared among groups. R (C) compare characteristics of taxonomic groups, including archaea, bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals. S HMH PowerPresentations.

Project Share. HMH Alternative Assessments. HMH Summative Assessments. TEKS SEs B.9ABCD Intervention Resources (B.9) Science Concepts. The student knows the significance of various molecules involved in metabolic processes and energy conversions that occur in living organisms.

The student is expected to: (A) compare the structures and functions of different types of biomolecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. R (B) compare the reactants and products of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in terms of energy and matter. S (C) identify and investigate the roles of enzymes. S (D) analyze and evaluate the evidence regarding formation of simple organic molecules and their organization into long complex molecules having information such as the DNA molecules for self-replicating life. S HMH PowerPresentations.

HMH Virtual Lab. Project Share. HMH Alternative Assessments. HMH Summative Assessments. Download and edit files as necessary.

TEKS SEs B.10ABC Intervention Resources (B.10) Science Concepts. The student knows that biological systems are composed of multiple levels. The student is expected to: (A) describe the interactions that occur among systems that perform the functions of regulation, nutrient absorption, reproduction, and defense from injury or illness in animals. R (B) describe the interactions that occur among systems that perform the functions of transport, reproduction, and response in plants. R (C) analyze the levels of organization in biological systems and relate the levels to each other and to the whole system. S HMH PowerPresentations.

Project Share. HMH Alternative Assessments. HMH Summative Assessments. TEKS SEs B.11ABCD Intervention Resources (B.11) Science Concepts.

The student knows that biological systems work to achieve and maintain balance. The student is expected to: (A) describe the role of internal feedback mechanisms in the maintenance of homeostasis. S (B) investigate and analyze how organisms, populations, and communities respond to external factors. S (C) summarize the role of microorganisms in both maintaining and disrupting the health of both organisms and ecosystems. S (D) describe how events and processes that occur during ecological succession can change populations and species diversity. R HMH PowerPresentations. HMH Virtual Labs.

Project Share. HMH Alternative Assessments.

6th Grade Staar Math Practice

HMH Summative Assessments. Download and edit files as necessary. TEKS SEs B.12ABCDEF Intervention Resources (B.12) Science Concepts. The student knows that interdependence and interactions occur within an environmental system. The student is expected to: (A) interpret relationships, including predation, parasitism, commensalism, mutualism, and competition among organisms. R (B) compare variations and adaptations of organisms in different ecosystems. S (C) analyze the flow of matter and energy through trophic levels using various models, including food chains, food webs, and ecological pyramids.

R (D) recognize that long-term survival of species is dependent on changing resource bases that are limited. S (E) describe the flow of matter through the carbon and nitrogen cycles and explain the consequences of disrupting these cycles. S (F) describe how environmental change can impact ecosystem stability. R HMH PowerPresentations. HMH Virtual Lab. HMH Alternative Assessments. HMH Summative Assessments.

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